Case Study 1:

While working with a university in St. Paul, MN, Katie partnered with their graduate studies programs. Katie developed a model to budget and forecast future tuition revenue. Using this model combined with expense assumptions the Graduate Studies Program was able to make decisions about adding satellite locations and online programming for students who were unable to make the commute into the metropolitan area. Calculating the return on investment was only one piece to this project, other considerations included competition, reputation with faculty, staff and students, and whether this model was sustainable and flexible enough to change with the fast paced changes in the industry and with technology.

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Case Study 2:

While working for a pediatric healthcare organization in Iowa, Katie’s financial analytical skills and modeling supported the growing operations of the nonprofit organization.  As part of an expansion plan, the healthcare organization reviewed different scenarios of adding locations starting a short-term acute rehabilitation facility. This required building renovation and property acquisition to accommodate children already being served by the organization. Taking into account construction costs, additional and different staffing models and new revenue streams,  the plan was executed and successful. Flexibility played a huge part in the success of the operation. Monitoring cash flow, working with regulators, and patients were all delicate factors that needed to be at the forefront of all the discussions.

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Case Study 3:

Financial analysis and long range planning is not just about expanding services or adding new locations. At a pediatric healthcare organization Katie was promoted to Accounting Manager for billing. In this position workflow and processes were evaluated as well as the current cash position and any short-term borrowing. As processes were improved, the number of days between service rendered and collection of payment dropped by 45%. Additionally, use of short-term borrowing (line of credit) was not necessary since cash flow had been vastly improved enough to meet current expense needs and maintain additional cash reserves. Constant review of client accounts was necessary to keep a healthy cash position.

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